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In recent weeks, there has been a lot of talk about voter fraud. President Donald Trump has even claimed that 3-5 million people voted illegally in the 2016 election, although he has not provided any evidence to support this claim. 

While there is no doubt that voter fraud does occur, it is important to look at the facts before making any decisions. 

This blog post will look at mail in voter fraud statistics from around the country. Stay tuned!!!

Editor Choice: Mail in Voter Fraud Statistics

  • 372 possible cases of double voting or voting on behalf of deceased people out of about 14.6 million votes cast by mail in the 2016 and 2018 general elections, or 0.0025 percent. (ERIC)
  • 31 credible instances of impersonation fraud from 2000 to 2014, out of more than 1 billion ballots cast. (FEC)
  • 4 documented cases of voter fraud found in 2020 Elections (Washington Post)
  • The likely percent of non-citizen voters in recent US elections is 0 (Harvard)
  • The 2016 election found no evidence of widespread voter fraud (ScienceDirect)

1. 372 possible cases of double voting or voting on behalf of deceased people out of about 14.6 million votes cast by mail.

Based on the data, mailing in your ballot is a safe bet. It’s highly unlikely that your ballot will be counted twice or not counted at all. It is possible for a person to cast a ballot on behalf of a deceased person, but this is quite rare and unlikely as well.

(ERIC)

2.31 credible instances of impersonation fraud from 2000 to 2014, out of more than 1 billion ballots cast.

Whenever a high-profile election is decided by a small margin, voter fraud becomes a talking point — and it almost always comes from Republicans. 

The reality is that impersonation fraud does occur, but it happens so rarely that most election experts are not particularly concerned about the threat.

(FEC)

3.4 documented cases of voter fraud found in 2020 Elections

Although voter fraud is very uncommon in the United States, and the 2018 midterms came away with relatively minor occurrences, there are still a few good reasons to be concerned.

 Luckily, there are plenty of ways to protect your vote, so hopefully the next few elections will go more smoothly for everyone involved.

(Washington Post)

4. The likely percent of non-citizen voters in recent US elections is 0.

The main takeaway is that non-citizens do not appear likely to have changed the outcome of the 2016 election, and that while there’s still some probability they could impact close races in the near future, there are larger trends such as a decline in the number of non-citizen immigrants overall (at least relative to native-born Americans) that would tend to decrease their share of the electorate, an increase in our level of citizenship enforcement, and an increasingly Democratic lean of immigrant groups.

( Harvard)

5. The 2016 election found no evidence of widespread voter fraud

We find little evidence of fraud or substantial voter impersonation in the 2016 elections. Following the election, many media outlets and President-elect Trump voiced concerns over illegal voting and alleged rampant voter fraud. 

However, our analysis finds that a far greater rate of voter fraud would have required an improbable rate of coordination among these voters. Moreover, changes to state laws and procedures since the 2012 election decreased the likelihood of widespread fraud. Therefore, allegations of widespread voter fraud are unfounded.

(ScienceDirect)

Final Thought

So what does this data tell us? The truth is that there is not much evidence to suggest widespread voter fraud. 

In fact, it seems as though there is more talk to fraudulent votes than actual cases of fraudulent votes. While there is no doubt that fraud does happen, the numbers do not show widespread cheating.

FAQs

Is mail in voting fraud very common?

Yes, it is. Unfortunately, mail in voting fraud is a common occurrence because it’s relatively easy to commit and very difficult to detect. There are a number of ways to commit mail in voting fraud, such as filling out ballots on behalf of others, forging signatures, or mailing ballots from outside the jurisdiction.

One of the problems with mail in voting is that there’s no way to verify that the person who signed the ballot is the same person who actually cast the vote. This makes it easy for people to commit fraud by casting votes on behalf of others or by forging signatures. Additionally, because ballots can be mailed from anywhere in the country, it’s difficult to track down and investigate cases of fraud.

How does voting by mail enable fraud?

Voting by mail enables fraud because it is much easier to fake or forge a vote when the voter doesn’t have to go to a polling place and cast their vote in person.

It’s also much easier to stuff the ballot box when votes are being cast by mail, because there’s no one there to monitor the process and make sure that only eligible voters are casting ballots. And finally, voting by mail makes it easy for people to vote multiple times, because they can cast ballots from all over the country without anyone ever knowing.

Can the 2020 Presidential Elections be delayed as Trump cites mail-in voting fraud?

There is no legal basis to delay the 2020 Presidential Elections.

Article II, Section 1 of the United States Constitution sets forth the manner in which Presidential elections are to be conducted. Pursuant to that section, “the President shall be elected by the people of the several states, voting in their respective states.” The only way in which a Presidential election could be delayed would be if Congress passed a law authorizing such a delay. There is no indication that Congress plans to do so.

Moreover, any attempt to delay the 2020 Presidential election would likely result in a flurry of litigation given that there is no constitutional basis for doing so. In addition, any action taken by state or local officials to delay or disrupt mail-in voting

Source 

ERIC

FEC.GOV

Washington Post

Harvard

ScienceDirect

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